Policy Press

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Community development as micropolitics

Comparing theories, policies and politics in America and Britain

Published

20 Jul 2016

Page count

192 pages

ISBN

978-1447313182

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%) Add to basket

Published

14 Jan 2015

Page count

192 pages

ISBN

978-1447313175

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£72.99 £58.39You save £14.60 (20%) Add to basket

Published

20 Jul 2016

Page count

192 pages

ISBN

978-1447321392

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%)Buy from Amazon.co.uk

Published

20 Jul 2016

Page count

192 pages

ISBN

978-1447321385

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%) Add to basket

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Community development is routinely invoked as a practical solution to tackle a myriad of social problems, even though there is little consensus about its meaning and purpose.

Through a comparative analysis of competing perspectives on community development since 1968, this book critically examines the contradictory ideas and practices that have shaped this field in the US and the UK. This approach exposes a problematic politics that have far-reaching consequences for those committed to working for social justice.

This accessible book offers an alternative model for thinking about the politics of community development and so will appeal to academics, postgraduate students and community development workers.

Akwugo Emejulu is Lecturer at the Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh and Co-Director of the Centre for Education for Racial Equality in Scotland. Prior to entering academia, she worked as a community organiser, a participatory action researcher and a trade union organiser. Her research interests include the political sociology race, gender and grassroots political movements.

What are the Micropolitics of Community Development?;

Community Development in a Post-Civil Rights America;

When Technocracy Met Marxism: The Community Development Projects in Britain;

Community Development and the Rise of the American New Right;

From Radicalism to Realism: Rethinking Community Development in a Post-Marxist Britain;

Commodifying Community: American Community Development and Neoliberal Hegemony;

A Return to Critique? Reassessing Marxian Analyses in British Community Development;

Between Economic Crisis and Austerity: What Next for Community Development in Britain and America?;

Bibliography.