Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

The End of Aspiration?

Social mobility and our children’s fading prospects

Published

1 Feb 2019

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1447348320

Dimensions

216 x 138 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£12.99 £10.39You save £2.60 (20%) Pre-order

Published

1 Feb 2019

Page count

176 pages

ISBN

978-1447348344

Dimensions

216 x 138 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£12.99 £10.39You save £2.60 (20%)
  • Coming soon
  • Published

    1 Feb 2019

    Page count

    176 pages

    ISBN

    978-1447348351

    Dimensions

    216 x 138 mm

    Imprint

    Policy Press
    £12.99 £10.39You save £2.60 (20%)

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    Why is it getting harder to secure a job that matches our qualifications, buy a home of our own and achieve financial stability?

    Underprivileged people have always faced barriers, but people from middle-income families are increasingly more likely to slide down the social scale than climb up.

    Duncan Exley, former Director of the Equality Trust, draws on expert research and real life experiences – including from an actor, a politician, a billionaire entrepreneur and a surgeon – to issue a wake-up call to break through segregated opportunity. He offers a manifesto to reboot our prospects and benefit all.

    Duncan Exley is the former Director of the Equality Trust, a charity founded by the authors of The Spirit Level (Penguin, second edition 2010) to address economic inequality in the UK. A former student of economic and social history, he has had a long career in leading campaigning organisations and projects that use research to change government policy and corporate practice.

    Despite being the son of a shop assistant and a ‘pit electrician’, Duncan has been described as part of ‘the establishment’. He tweets as @Duncan_Exley.

    Introduction: What the hell am I doing here?;

    The Great Meritocracy: How socially mobile is the UK?;

    Do life-chances begin at birth?;

    Early Years;

    School years;

    Choosing a path;

    Higher education (formal and informal);

    Getting a job;

    Career Progression;

    Work versus wealth;

    Does social mobility matter?;

    Conclusion.