Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

The modern slavery agenda

Politics, policy and practice in the UK

Published

1 Mar 2019

Page count

240 pages

ISBN

978-1447346807

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%) Pre-order

Published

1 Mar 2019

Page count

240 pages

ISBN

978-1447346791

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%) Pre-order

Published

1 Mar 2019

Page count

240 pages

ISBN

978-1447346821

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%)
  • Coming soon
  • Published

    1 Mar 2019

    Page count

    240 pages

    ISBN

    978-1447346838

    Dimensions

    234 x 156 mm

    Imprint

    Policy Press
    £24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%)

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    Modern slavery, in the form of labour exploitation, domestic servitude, sexual trafficking, child labour and cannabis farming, is still growing in the UK and industrialised countries, despite the introduction of laws to try to stem it. This hugely topical book, by a team of high-profile activists and expert writers, is the first critically to assess the legislation, using evidence from across the field, and to offer strategies for improvement in policy and practice. It argues that, contrary to its claims to be ‘world-leading’, the Modern Slavery Act is inconsistent, inadequate and punitive; and that the UK government, through its labour market and immigration policies, is actually creating the conditions for slavery to be promoted.

    Gary Craig is Emeritus Professor of Social Justice at the Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation at the University of Hull and Visiting Professor at three other universities. He previously worked as a community development activist. He has researched and published widely in the fields of ‘poverty, ‘race’ and ethnicity and modern slavery; He co-convenes the national network Modern Slavery Research Consortium.

    Alex Balch is Professor, Department of Politics, University of Liverpool. He is also Associate Head of School for Research and Impact and Co-Director, the Centre for the Study of International Slavery. He has researched and published widely on forced labour, migration, support for survivors and on the organizational systems in the UK such as the GLAA and Border Agency.

    Dr Hannah Lewis is Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow, at the University of Sheffield. Her research interests include community and social relationships, migration and refugee studies; immigration and asylum policy; forced labour and ‘modern slavery’, faith and anti-trafficking; and the ethics and methodologies of research with migrant populations. Her work has been published in many journals and she has contributed to three books.

    Louise Waite is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Leeds, UK. Her research interests focus on discourses of ‘modern slavery’, unfree/forced labour and exploitative work among asylum seekers and refugees. She has published in a range of peer reviewed journals and in recent collaborative books

    Introduction: Modern slavery in historical context ~ The Editors;

    The European approach to tackling modern slavery and the UK’s place within it ~ Klara Skrivankova;

    Modern slavery: The global picture ~ Aidan McQuade;

    Modern slavery: UK legal and policy frameworks ~ Ruth van Dyke;

    Class acts: The Modern Slavery Acts – a comparative analysis ~ Vicky Brotherton;

    Child slavery in the UK ~ Chloe Setter;

    Human Trafficking: symptom not cause ~ Kate Roberts;

    The Organisational and Enforcement Challenge to ‘Defeat’ Modern Slavery ~ Alex Balch;

    Trafficking for Cannabis Cultivation and the Responses to it in the United Kingdom: Punishing the Wrong People ~ Patrick Burland;

    Supply chains - what does section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act require and what is the role of business in tackling modern slavery issues? ~ Colleen Theron;

    Migrant ‘illegality’, slavery and exploitative work ~ Louise Waite and Hannah Lewis;

    Conclusion.