Policy Press

Publishing with a purpose

Care, Crisis and Activism

The Politics of Everyday Life

By Eleanor Jupp

Published

Feb 14, 2022

Page count

160 pages

ISBN

978-1447353003

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press

Published

Feb 14, 2022

Page count

160 pages

ISBN

978-1447353034

Dimensions

Imprint

Policy Press
Care, Crisis and Activism

What kinds of care are being offered or withdrawn by the welfare state? What does this mean for the caring practices and interventions of local activists?

Shedding new light on austerity and neoliberal welfare reform in the UK, this book considers local action and activism within contexts of crisis, including the COVID-19 pandemic.

Presenting case studies of local action, from protesting cuts to children’s services, to local food provisioning and support for migrant women, this book makes visible often unseen practices of activism. It shows how the creativity and persistence of such local practices can be seen as enacting wider visions of how care should be provided by society.

“Eleanor Jupp explores the local and less visible forms of activism that have arisen as women have sought to fill the vacuum left by a retreating state. Her analysis will inspire and inform research on gender, welfare and austerity.” Julie MacLeavy, University of Bristol

"Eeanor Jupp’s research traces the emergence of local creativity and activism in the face of current crises of care. These offer ways of transcending the perverse conjunction of austerity and COVID-19 in the UK." Janet Newman, Open University

Eleanor Jupp is Senior Lecturer in Social Policy at the University of Kent.

Introduction: sticking plasters and cotton wool

1. Care, austerity and the politics of everyday lives

2. Citizenship and community in times of crisis

3. Journeys into and through local activism under austerity

4. Austerity politics and infrastructures of care: Children’s Centre closures and activism

5. Small stories and political change: local activism across time and space

6. Provisioning in times of crisis

7. Conclusions: a politics of everyday life?