Publishing with a purpose

Devolution and social citizenship in the UK

Edited by Scott L. Greer

Published

21 Jan 2009

Page count

248 pages

ISBN

978-1847420350

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£27.99 £22.39You save £5.60 (20%) Add to basket

Published

21 Jan 2009

Page count

248 pages

ISBN

978-1847420367

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%) Add to basket
Devolution and social citizenship in the UK

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Most of the expansive literature on social citizenship follows its leading thinker, T. H. Marshall, and talks only about the British state, often referring only to England. But social citizenship rights require taxation, spending, effective public services and politics committed to them. They can only be as strong as politics makes them. That means that the distinctive territorial politics of the UK are reshaping citizenship rights as they reshape policies, obligations and finance across the UK.

This timely book explores how changing territorial politics are impacting on social citizenship rights across the UK. The contributors contend that whilst territorial politics have always been major influences in the meaning and scope of social citizenship rights, devolved politics are now increasingly producing different social citizenship rights in different parts of the UK. Moreover, they are doing it in ways that few scholars or policymakers expect or can trace.

Drawing on extensive research over the last 10 years, the book brings together leading scholars of devolution and citizenship to chart the connection between the politics of devolution and the meaning of social citizenship in the UK. The first part of the book connects the large, and largely distinct, literatures on citizenship, devolution and the welfare state. The empirical second part identifies the different issues that will shape the future territorial politics of citizenship in the UK: intergovernmental relations and finance; policy divergence; bureaucratic politics; public opinion; and the European Union. It will be welcomed by academics and students in social policy, public policy, citizenship studies, politics and political science.

"The feverish nature of the devolution debate in the UK means that it rarely gets beyond the ideological realm of claim and counter-claim, a process that generates more heat than light. Occasionally a book comes along that sheds some genuine light on the underlying issues, and this is undoubtedly one of them." Kevin Morgan, Professor of Governance and Development, School of City and Regional Planning, Cardiff University

"The combination of a critical engagement with T.H. Marshall's work alongside a contemporary discussion of devolution make this book a valuable and important addition to the citizenship literature. Highly recommended." Peter Dwyer, The Graduate School, BLSS (Business, Law and Social Sciences), Nottingham Trent University

Morgan's testimonial in reviews

Scott L. Greer teaches Health Policy and Management at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and is also Senior Research Fellow at LSE Health.

Introduction: devolution and citizenship rights ~ Scott L. Greer and Margitta Maetzke; Part one: Equality and Marshallian citizenship: why E does not equal MC ~ Martin Powell; Citizenship in space and time: observations on T.H. Marshall's Citizenship and social class ~ Daniel Wincott; Social citizenship and the question of gender: the suitability and possibilities of a Marshallian framework ~ Richenda Gambles and Adam Whitworth; Part two: Devolution, public attitudes and social citizenship ~ Charlie Jeffery; Social citizenship, devolution and policy divergence ~ Michael Keating; Un-joined-up government: intergovernmental relations and citizenship rights ~ Alan Trench; Social citizenship and intergovernmental finance ~ Iain McLean, Guy Lodge and Katie Schmuecker; How uniform are uniform services? Towards a geography of citizenship ~ Martin Powell; Ever closer union: devolution, the European Union, and social citizenship rights ~ Scott L. Greer.