Policy Press

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Growing Up and Getting By

International Perspectives on Childhood and Youth in Hard Times

Edited by John Horton, Helena Pimlott-Wilson and Sarah Hall

Published

Apr 28, 2021

Page count

372 pages

ISBN

978-1447352891

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press

Published

Apr 28, 2021

Page count

372 pages

ISBN

978-1447352945

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
GBP 29.99 GBP 23.99You save GBP 6.00 (20%)
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    Growing Up and Getting By

    Bringing together new, multidisciplinary research, this book explores how children and young people across Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas

    experience and cope with situations of poverty and precarity.

    It looks at the impact of neoliberalism, austerity and global economic crisis, evidencing the multiple harms and inequalities caused. It also examines the different ways that children, young people and families ‘get by’ under these challenging circumstances, showing how they care for one another and envisage more hopeful socio-political futures.

    “A fascinating collection that shows how the intersection of global and local forces exacerbates inequalities in the life chances of young people in a wide range of locations. A perfect illustration of why a geographical imagination still matters.” Linda McDowell, University of Oxford

    "This is a timely, urgent and necessary book. Each chapter is a beautifully written gem. It will define the field for some time to come." Heather Montgomery, The Open University

    “A passionate reckoning with the global and intimate tolls of neoliberalism, austerity and economic crises for children and childhood. Across disparate geographies it reveals how the baleful ricochets of ‘hard times’ are met, known and challenged.” Cindi Katz, City University of New York.

    John Horton is Professor in the Faculty of Health, Education & Society at the University of Northampton.

    Helena Pimlott-Wilson is Reader in Human Geography at Loughborough University.

    Sarah Marie Hall is Reader in Human Geography at the University of Manchester.

    Introduction ~ John Horton, Helena Pimlott-Wilson and Sarah Marie Hall

    PART I: Transformations

    Reconceptualising inner-city education? Marketisation, strategies and competition in the gentrified city ~ Eric Larsson and Anki Bengtsson

    Youth migration to Lima: vulnerability or opportunity, exclusion or network-building? ~ Dena Aufseeser

    Sleepless in Seoul: understanding sleepless youth and their practices at 24-hour cafés through neoliberal governmentality ~ Jonghee Lee- Caldararo

    ‘Live like a college student’: student loan debt and the college experience ~ Denise Goerisch

    ‘Everywhere feels like home’: transnational neoliberal subjects negotiating the future ~ Michael Boampong

    PART II: Intersections/inequalities

    Negotiating social and familial norms: women’s labour market participation in rural Bangladesh and North India ~ Heather Piggott

    Marginalised youth perspectives and positive uncertainty in Addis Ababa and Kathmandu ~ Vicky Johnson and Andy West

    Infantilised parents and criminalised children: the frame of childhood in UK poverty discourse ~ Aura Lehtonen and Jacob Breslow

    Learning to pay: the financialisation of childhood ~ Carl Walker, Peter Squires and Carlie Goldsmith

    Immigration, employment precarity and masculinity in Filipino- Canadian families ~ Philip Kelly

    The undeserving poor and the happy poor: interrelations between the politics of global charity and austerity for young people in Britain ~ Ruth Cheung Judge

    PART III: Futures

    Looking towards the future: intersectionalities of race, class and place in young Colombians’ lives ~ Sonja Marzi

    ‘My aim is to take over Zane Lowe’: young people’s imagined futures at a community radio station (UK) ~ Catherine Wilkinson

    Dependent subjects and financial inclusion: launching a credit union on a campus in Taiwan ~ Hao-Che Pei and Chiung-wen Chang

    ‘If you think about the future you are just troubling yourself’: uncertain futures among caregiving and non-caregiving youth in Zambia ~ Caroline Day

    Conclusions and futures: growing up and getting by ~ Helena Pimlott-Wilson, Sarah Marie Hall and John Horton