Policy Press

Publishing with a purpose

Lived Experiences of Ableism in Academia

Strategies for Inclusion in Higher Education

Edited by Nicole Brown

Published

May 25, 2021

Page count

248 pages

ISBN

978-1447354116

Dimensions

216 x 138 mm

Imprint

Policy Press

Published

May 25, 2021

Page count

248 pages

ISBN

978-1447354130

Dimensions

216 x 138 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
GBP 24.99 GBP 19.99You save GBP 5.00 (20%)
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    Lived Experiences of Ableism in Academia

    Demands for excellence and efficiency have created an ableist culture in academia. What impact do these expectations have on disabled, chronically ill and neurodivergent colleagues?

    This important and eye-opening collection explores ableism in academia from the viewpoint of academics' personal and professional experiences and scholarship. Through the theoretical lenses of autobiography, autoethnography, embodiment, body work and emotional labour, contributors present insightful, critical, analytical and rigorous explorations of being ‘othered’ in academia.

    Deeply embedded in personal experiences, this perceptive book provides examples for universities to develop inclusive practices, accessible working and learning conditions and a less ableist environment.

    “Using ‘lived experience’ first-hand accounts, this volume illuminates the complex and often shocking experience of combining the aspirations and demands of academic life with the stigma of managing disability and chronic illness.” Gillian Bendelow, University of Brighton

    Nicole Brown is Director of Social Research & Practice and Education Ltd and Lecturer in Education in the Department of Culture, Communication and Media at the UCL Institute of Education.

    Introduction: Being ‘different’ in academia ~ Nicole Brown

    PART I: Ways of knowing

    A leg to stand on: irony, autoethnography and ableism in the academy ~ Laura L. Ellingson

    “There’s no place for emotions in academia”: experiences of the neoliberal academy as a disabled scholar ~ Angharad Butler-Rees

    Embodiment and authenticity: how embodied research might shed light on experiences of disability and chronic illness ~ Jennifer Leigh

    What’s in a word? Rephrasing and reframing disability ~ Sharon Smith

    Intermezzo

    PART II: Lived experiences

    Colour blindness in academia: the challenges of an invisible impairment ~ Oliver Daddow

    Stammering in academia: voice in the management of self and others ~ Robert H. Mann and Bryan C. Clift

    Losing my voice (physically and metaphorically) ~ Jeanne Barczewska

    Deafness and hearing loss in higher education ~ Nicole Brown

    Living with collagenous colitis as a busy academic: chronic illness and the intersection of age and gender inequality ~ Rosalind Janssen

    Three cheers for Access to Work partnership: two cheers for Two Ticks and one question about a university-wide self-disclosure scheme ~ Chris Mounsey and Stan Booth

    “I’m not saying this to be petty”: reflections on making disability visible while teaching ~ Emma Sheppard

    #AutisticsInAcademia ~ Chloe Farahar and Annette Foster

    “I’ve always wanted to be a nurse …”: challenging academic ableist assumptions ~ Jo Sullivan

    Ableism in music academicism ~ Ben Lunn

    Teaching with and supporting teachers with dyslexia in higher education ~ Jennifer Hiscock and Jennifer Leigh

    Depressed academics: building a group blog community ~ Mikael Vejdemo- Johansson and Ian P. Gent

    Cancer, bereavement and work ~ Nicola Martin

    Invisible disabilities and (re)negotiating identity: life after major traumatic injury ~ Clare Lewis

    Conclusion: Disability imaginary of the future ~ Nicole Brown