Policy Press

Publishing with a purpose

Qualitative and Digital Research in times of Crisis

Methods, Reflexivity and Ethics

Edited by Helen Kara and Su-Ming Khoo

Published

Oct 1, 2021

Page count

240 pages

ISBN

978-1447363798

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press

Published

Oct 1, 2021

Page count

240 pages

ISBN

978-1447363811

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
GBP 28.99 GBP 23.19You save GBP 5.80 (20%)
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    Crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, disasters or violent conflict present numerous challenges for researchers. Faced with disruption, obstacles and even danger to their own lives, researchers in times of crisis must adapt or redesign existing research methods in order to continue their work effectively.

    Including contributions on qualitative and digital research from Europe, Asia, Africa, Australasia and the Americas, this volume explores the creative and thoughtful ways in which researchers have adapted methods and rethought relationships in response to challenges arising from crises. Their collective reflections, strategies and practices highlight the importance of responsive, ethical and creative research design and the need to develop methods for fostering mutual, reflexive and healthy relationships in times of crisis.

    Helen Kara has been an independent researcher since 1999 and specialises in creative research methods and ethics.

    Su-Ming Khoo is Senior Lecturer in Political Science and Sociology at the National University of Ireland, Galway. She specialises in critical development studies, human rights, higher education and decolonial and transdisciplinary approaches.

    Introduction ~ Su-ming Khoo and Helen Kara

    Part 1: Reflexivity and Ethics

    Just Because You Can, Doesn’t Mean You Should ~ Ali FitzGibbon

    Ethnography in Crisis: Methodology in the Cracks ~ Zania Koppe

    Phenomenology of Lived Experience: Multi-Layered Approach and Positionality ~ Bibek Dahal

    Part 2: Arts-Based Approaches

    The Arts of Making-Sense in Uncertain Times: Arts-Based Research and Autoethnography ~ Deborah Green, Amanda Levey, Bettina Evans, Wendy Lawson and Kathrin Marks

    Practice-Based Research in Times of Crisis: Weaving Community Together during Lockdown ~ Gretchen Stolte and Lisa Oliver

    Communicating Crisis Research with Comics: Representation, Process and Pedagogy ~ Gemma Sou and Sarah Marie Hall

    Part 3: Digital Methods

    Developing a Collaborative Autonetnographic Approach to Researching Doctoral Students’ Online Experiences ~ Richard McGrath, Holly Bowen-Salter, Emma Milanese and Phoebe Pearce

    The Ethical Implications of Using Digital Traces: Studying Explainability and Trust During a Pandemic ~ Natasha Dwyer, Hector Miller-Bakewell, Tessa Darbyshire, Anirban Basu and Steve Marsh

    The Use of Objects to Enhance Online Social Research Interviews ~ Maged Zakher and Hoda Wassif

    Qualitative Data Re-Use and Secondary Analysis: Researching In and about a Crisis ~ Anna Tarrant and Kahryn Hughes

    Researching Older Vietnam-Born Migrants at a Distance: The Role of Digital Kinning ~ Hien Thi Nguyen, Loretta Baldassar, Raelene Wilding and Lukasz Krzyzowski

    Part 4: Recurring and longer-term crises

    A Timed Crisis: Australian Education, Migrant Asian Teachers and Critical Autoethnography ~ Aaron Teo

    Building Relationships and Praxis despite Persistent Obstacles ~ Maria Grazia Imperiale

    Managing Ethical Tensions When Conducting Research in Fragile and Conflict-Affected Contexts ~ Gbenga Akinlolu Shadare

    Beyond Extraction: Co-creating a Decolonial and Feminist Research Practice in Post-conflict Guatemala ~ Aisling Walsh

    Conclusion ~ Helen Kara and Su-ming Khoo