Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

Rural ageing

A good place to grow old?

Edited by Norah C Keating

Published

14 May 2008

Page count

168 pages

Series

Ageing and the Lifecourse series

ISBN

978-1861349019

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£27.99 £22.39You save £5.60 (20%) Add to basket

Published

14 May 2008

Page count

176 pages

Series

Ageing and the Lifecourse series

ISBN

978-1861349026

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%) Add to basket
Rural ageing

North and South American customers click here

This important book addresses a growing international interest in 'age-friendly' communities. It examines the conflicting stereotypes of rural communities as either idyllic and supportive or isolated and bereft of services. Providing detailed information on the characteristics of rural communities, contributors ask the question, 'good places for whom'?

The book extends our understanding of the intersections of rural people and places across the adult lifecourse. Taking a critical human ecology perspective, authors trace lifecourse changes in community and voluntary engagement and in the availability of social support. They illustrate diversity among older adults in social inclusion and in the types of services that are essential to their well being. For the first time, detailed information is provided on characteristics of rural communities that make them supportive to different groups of older adults. Comparisons between the UK and North America highlight similarities in how landscapes create rural identities, and fundamental differences in how climate, distance and rural culture shape the everyday lives of older adults. 

"Rural ageing" is a valuable resource for students, academics and practitioners interested in communities, rural settings and ageing and the lifecourse. Rich in national profiles and grounded in the narratives of older adults, it provides theoretical, empirical and practical examples of growing old in rural communities never before presented.

"Are rural environments good places in which to grow old? This pioneering volume addresses this question in new and insightful ways. The contributors have produced a work that is 'fresh' and essential reading for scholars, practitioners and policy makers." Graham D. Rowles, Ph.D., Professor and Director, Graduate Center for Gerontology, University of Kentucky

"This volume brings together a distinguished group of researchers working in the field of rural gerontology and gives an excellent balance between theoretical perspectives and empirical findings. It challenges conventional stereotypes of rural ageing and provides important lessons for policy-makers and practitioners alike." Chris Phillipson, Professor of Applied Social Studies and Social Gerontology, Keele University

Norah Keating is Professor of Human Ecology and Co-director of Research on Ageing, Policies and Practice at the University of Alberta. Her program of research focuses on the contributions made by older adults to the voluntary, community and family/friend sectors including family caregiving and community engagement. She has a particular interest in how community contexts such as rural settings might foster ageing-well.

A critical human ecology perspective on rural ageing ~ Norah Keating and Judith Phillips; Crossing borders: life course, rural ageing and disability ~ Tamara Daly and Gordon Grant; Rurality and ageing well: 'a long time here' ~ Sherry Ann Chapman and Sheila Peace; The evolution of networks of rural older adults ~ G.Clare Wenger and Norah Keating; Distance, privacy and independence: rural homecare ~ Joanie Sims Gould and Anne Martin-Matthews; Respite for rural and remote caregivers ~ Neena Chappell, Bonnie Schroeder and Michelle Gibbens; Ageing, disability and participation ~ Janet Fast and Jenny de Jong Gierveld; Participation in rural contexts: community matters ~ Julia Rozanova, Donna Dosman and Jenny de Jong Gierveld; Staying connected: issues of mobility of older rural adults ~ Bonnie Dobbs and Laurel Strain; Ageing and social exclusion in rural communities ~ Thomas Scharf and Bernadette Bartlam; Age-friendly rural communities ~ Jacquie Eales, Janice Keefe and Norah Keating; Revisiting rural ageing ~ Norah Keating.