Policy Press

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Social Housing, Wellbeing and Welfare

By James Gregory

Published

Jan 1, 2022

Page count

184 pages

ISBN

978-1447348504

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press

Published

Jan 1, 2022

Page count

184 pages

ISBN

978-1447347910

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press

Published

Jan 1, 2022

Page count

184 pages

ISBN

978-1447348580

Dimensions

Imprint

Policy Press
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    Published

    Jan 1, 2022

    Page count

    184 pages

    ISBN

    978-1447348542

    Dimensions

    Imprint

    Policy Press
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    Social Housing, Wellbeing and Welfare

    This book offers a balanced analysis of competing interpretations of the role and social value of social housing in the UK.

    Exploring the place of social housing in the modern welfare state, it provides new thinking on the relationship between housing and wellbeing, and issues a challenge to the pervasive policy and social consensus that owner-occupation is the ‘natural’ choice of aspiring people.

    It argues against the idea that social housing is somehow ‘bad’ for you, or that it causes poverty or dependency and proposes a more radical approach to social housing policy in the future.

    James Gregory is Senior Research Fellow, Centre on Household Assets and Savings Management at the University of Birmingham

    Introduction. Wellbeing, housing and the home

    The distribution of social housing. Who gets what, and why?

    What’s in a name? The meaning of social housing

    Discourses of dependency; social housing, welfare and political debate

    Interpreting fact: is social housing really bad for you?

    Wellbeing and social housing: approaches to impact

    Narratives of principle and practice; claiming history, contesting purpose

    Rethinking the 'social' in social housing; common needs, shared identities

    From principle to practice – diverse needs, mixed solutions

    Conclusion: housing, wellbeing and citizenship