Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

The Sociology of Debt

Published

8 May 2019

Page count

224 pages

ISBN

978-1447339526

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%) Pre-order

Published

8 May 2019

Page count

224 pages

ISBN

978-1447339557

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)
  • Coming soon
  • Published

    8 May 2019

    Page count

    224 pages

    ISBN

    978-1447339564

    Dimensions

    234 x 156 mm

    Imprint

    Policy Press
    £26.99 £21.59You save £5.40 (20%)

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    Over the course of the last 10 years the issue of debt has become a serious problem that threatens to destroy the global socio-economic system and ruin the everyday lives of millions of people. This collection brings together a range of perspectives of key thinkers on debt to provide a sociological analysis focused upon the social, political, economic, and cultural meanings of indebtedness.

    The contributors to the book consider both the lived experience of debt and the more abstract processes of financialisation taking place globally. Showing how debt functions on the level of both macro and micro economics, the book also provides a more holistic perspective, with accounts that span sociological, cultural, and economic forms of analysis.

    ''A sociological study of debt is long overdue, and this volume brilliantly builds on and surpasses earlier work in economic sociology, philosophy, and, political economy. Each contribution will appeal to readers with academic, political, or personal interests in the macro- and micro-political reframing of indebtedness.''

    Thomas Kemple, University of British Columbia

    Mark Featherstone is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Keele University. His research specialisms include social theory, critical theory, and psychoanalysis and he has published a number of books and journal articles in these fields. He is currently co-editor of the journal Cultural Politics.

    Introduction: Towards A Sociology of Debt ~ Mark Featherstone;

    Debt, Complexity and The Sociological Imagination ~ Lisa Adkins;

    Debt Drive and the Imperative of Growth ~ Ole Bjerg;

    Memory, Counter-Memory, and Resistance: Notes on the ‘Greek Debt Truth Commission’ ~ Joshua Bowsher;

    ‘Deferred Lives’: Money, Debt, and the Financialized Futures of Young Temporary Workers ~ Mark Davis and Laura Cartwright;

    “Choose your moments”: Discipline and Speculation in the Indebted Everyday ~ Samuel Kirwan, Leila Dawney, and Rosie Walker;

    Digital Subprime: Tracking the Credit Trackers ~ Joe Deville;

    Debt, Usury and the Ongoing Crises of Capitalism ~ Nicholas Gane;

    The Art of Unpayable Debt ~ Max Haiven;

    Ecologies of Indebtedness ~ Mark Featherstone.