Policy Press

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Values in criminology and community justice

Published

18 Mar 2015

Page count

384 pages

ISBN

978-1447300366

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
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Published

18 Sep 2013

Page count

384 pages

ISBN

978-1447300359

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
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Published

18 Mar 2015

Page count

384 pages

ISBN

978-1447320630

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£27.99 £22.39You save £5.60 (20%) Add to basket

Published

18 Mar 2015

Page count

384 pages

ISBN

978-1447320647

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
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The way we think about crime and the way that society responds to it are imbued with values that can determine what is considered important and what gets attention. Sometimes values that are claimed may not be the values expressed in practice, as we see in the multiple and confusing discourses about victims and offenders, punishment and protection, rights and responsibilities.

This collection of writings considers values in crime theory, criminal justice and research practice, uncovering the many different 'sides' – to echo Howard Becker's famous phrase – that criminologists, policy makers and researchers take. It spans Marxist, postmodernist and feminist perspectives on criminology, analyses of the dynamics of race, gender and age, research methods and ethics, the working of the criminal justice system and engages with current debates about new challenges for criminology, such as the green movement and Islamophobia.

This is a timely and thought-provoking collection which will be of interest to academics and students in criminology and criminal justice, and on professional courses, such as probation and youth justice practice.

Malcolm Cowburn is Emeritus Professor of Applied Social Science at Sheffield Hallam University and Co-Chair of the British Society of Criminology Professional affairs and Ethics Committee.

Marian Duggan is a senior lecturer in Criminology at Sheffield Hallam University whose research and teaching interests focus on gender, sexuality, hate crime victimisation and sexual offending.

Anne Robinson is a senior lecturer at Sheffield Hallam University and leads the programme for probation officer training. She previously worked in youth justice and is a former YOT manager.

Paul Senior is Professor of Probation Studies and Director of a contract research and consultancy centre, the Hallam Centre for Community Justice, at Sheffield Hallam University.

A brief introduction ~ Malcolm Cowburn;

Section One: Values of criminological theories;

Judging offenders: the moral implications of criminological theories ~ Simon Cottee;

Post-modernism and criminological thought: 'Whose science? Whose knowlege?' ~ Liz Austen with Malcolm Cowburn;

Marxist criminologies: whose side, which values? ~ David Moxon;

A contemporary reflection on feminist criminology: whose side are we on? ~Victoria Lavis and Tammi Walker;

Bringing the boys back home: re-engendering criminology ~ Anthony Ellis and Maggie Wykes;

New 'racisms' and prejudices? The criminalisation of 'Asian' ~ Sunita Toor;

The value(s) of cultural criminology ~ James Banks and David Moxon;

Justifying 'green' criminology: values and 'taking sides' in an ecologically informed social science ~ Gary R. Potter;

Section Two: Values in criminal justice;

A moral in the story? Virtues, values and desistance from crime ~ Fergus McNeill and Stephen Farrall;

The value of values in probation practice? ~Jean Henderson;

Developments in police education in England and Wales: values, culture and 'common-sense' policing ~ Craig Paterson and Ed Pollock;

Race, religion and human rights: valuable lessons from prison ~ Muzammil Quraishi;

The public-private divide: which side is criminal justice on? ~ Stephen Riley;

Working with victims: values and validations ~ Marian Duggan;

Money as the measure of man: values and value in the politics of reparation ~ Claire Moon;

Section Three: Values in research, policy and practice;

The Emperor's new clothes? Can Big Society deliver criminal justice? ~ Kevin Wong;

What's valuable, what's valued in today's youth justice? ~ Anne Robinson;

Economic values and evidence: evaluating criminal justice policy ~ Kevin Albertson, Katherine Albertson, Chris Fox and Dan Ellingworth;

Reflections on values and ethics in narrative inquiry with (ex-)offenders ~ Paula Hamilton and Katherine Albertson;

Working with different values: extremism, hate and sex crimes ~ Malcolm Cowburn, Marian Duggan and Ed Pollock;

Value for money? The politics of contract research ~ Paul Senior.

“This book is an essential corrective to the tendency to discuss criminal justice solely in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and economy. Well-known scholars are joined by newer voices in this wide-ranging and inter-disciplinary collection to show that criminal justice is irreducibly concerned with values and moral judgements.” Professor Robert Canton, De Montfort University Leicester

“This is a timely, imaginative and thoughtful book which sets a new agenda for criminology.Examining allegiances and rights in different areas of criminological research, policy and practice, the contributors pose some searching questions about values and ‘whose side we are on’.” Professor Loraine Gelsthorpe, University of Cambridge. President of the British Society of Criminology