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Why Who Cleans Counts

What Housework Tells Us about American Family Life

Published

19 Feb 2020

Page count

224 pages

ISBN

978-1447336754

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£16.99 £8.49You save £8.50 (50%) Pre-order

Published

19 Feb 2020

Page count

224 pages

ISBN

978-1447336747

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£65.00 £32.50You save £32.50 (50%) Pre-order

Published

19 Feb 2020

Page count

224 pages

ISBN

978-1447336778

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£16.99 £8.50You save £8.49 (50%)
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    Every household has to perform housework, and researchers know a lot about what predicts who does which chores, drawing frequently from theoretical explanations that highlight the importance of power dynamics. This book moves beyond the existing scholarship by using quantitative, nationally representative survey data to theorize about how power dynamics as reflected in housework performance help us understand broader family variations. The authors investigate how knowing who cleans the house explains how households of differing forms, demographics and compositions operate, both cross-sectionally and over the life course of the household.

    Shannon N. Davis is Professor of Sociology at George Mason University. She studies the division of household labor and gender ideologies, as well as undergraduate researchers and their mentors.

    Theodore N. Greenstein is Professor of Sociology at North Carolina State University. His research interests include work and the family, the division of household labor, and maternal employment.

    Introduction: What Do We Know about Housework?

    Theorizing Housework as an Example of Power Dynamics

    Describing the Data

    The Five Classes

    Housework Class Characteristics

    Housework Class Consequences

    Stability and Change in Class Membership over Time

    Housework over the Family Life Course

    Housework and Socialization

    Conclusions