Ethnic Inequalities in a Time of Crisis

Findings from the Evidence for Equality National Survey

Edited by Nissa Finney, James Nazroo, Laia Bécares, Dharmi Kapadia and Natalie Shlomo

Published

Apr 1, 2023

Page count

192 pages

ISBN

978-1447368847

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press

Published

Apr 1, 2023

Page count

192 pages

ISBN

978-1447368854

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press

Published

Apr 1, 2023

Page count

192 pages

ISBN

978-1447368861

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press

EPub and ePDF available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence.

This book illustrates life through the COVID-19 pandemic for ethnic minorities in Britain.

Drawing from the Evidence for Equality National Survey (EVENS), the book compares the experiences of ethnic and religious minorities in work and finances, housing and households, health and wellbeing, policing and politics, racism and discrimination in the UK. Using unrivalled data in terms of population and topic coverage, the book presents new evidence of ethnic inequalities and sheds new light on underlying racisms, opening them up to debate as crucial social concerns.

Written by leading international experts in the field, this is a must-read for anyone interested in contemporary ethnic inequalities and racism from academics and policy makers to voluntary and community sector organisations.

Nissa Finney is Professor of Human Geography at the University of St Andrews.

James Nazroo is Professor of Sociology at The University of Manchester.

Laia Becares is Senior Lecturer in Applied Social Sciences at the University of Sussex.

Dharmi Kapadia is Lecturer in Sociology at The University of Manchester.

Natalie Shlomo is Professor of Social Statistics at The University of Manchester.

1. Introduction: the need for a new survey

2. The making of the EVENS Survey

3. Ethnic identity

4. Racism and discrimination

5. Health, wellbeing and coronavirus

6. Housing, family and place

7. Work and employment

8. Socio-economic situation

9. Political participation and Black Lives Matter

10. Conclusion