Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

Understanding community

Politics, policy and practice

Published

25 Apr 2016

Page count

272 pages

Edition

2nd Edition

Series

Understanding Welfare: Social Issues, Policy and Practice series

ISBN

978-1447316084

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%) Add to basket

Published

25 Apr 2016

Page count

272 pages

Edition

2nd Edition

Series

Understanding Welfare: Social Issues, Policy and Practice series

ISBN

978-1447316077

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£70.00 £56.00You save £14.00 (20%) Add to basket

Published

25 Apr 2016

Page count

272 pages

Edition

2nd Edition

Series

Understanding Welfare: Social Issues, Policy and Practice series

ISBN

978-1447328070

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%) Add to basket

Published

25 Apr 2016

Page count

272 pages

Edition

2nd Edition

Series

Understanding Welfare: Social Issues, Policy and Practice series

ISBN

978-1447328063

Dimensions

240 x 172 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£23.99 £19.19You save £4.80 (20%)Buy from Amazon.co.uk

This substantially revised edition of a highly topical text draws upon theory from Marx and Bourdieu to offer a clearer understanding of community in capitalist society. The book takes a more critical look at the literature on community, community development and the politics of community, and applies this critical approach to themes introduced in the first edition on economic development, learning, health and social care, housing, and policing, taking into account the changes in policy that have taken place, particularly in the UK, since the first edition was written. It will be a valuable resource for researchers and students of social policy, sociology and politics as well as areas of housing and urban studies.

Peter Somerville is Professor of Social Policy and Head of the Policy Studies Research Centre at the University of Lincoln, England. He has researched and published widely on issues of housing, policing, race equality, substance misuse, homelessness, cooperative enterprise and community governance.

PART I;

The nature of community;

Capital, class and community;

Political community under capitalism;

Governmental approaches to community;

PART II;

Community economic development (CED);

Community learning;

Community health and social care;

Housing and community;

Community policing;

Conclusion.

"It is topical, well referenced and contains plenty to consider..a useful text for those studying social policy, sociology, community development, urban regeneration and social work." Journal of Social Policy

"Very clear introduction to concepts and issues surroudning community linking theoretical models very clearly with practice examples." Dexter duBoulay, Coventry University

"In the second edition of his Understanding community, Peter Somerville sets out to restore rigour to the language of community, rendering it once again a purposeful analytical framework as well as a realisable social goal." Housing Studies

"Not only extremely valuable as a resource for students, but also a powerful contribution to debates about the nature of community and its potential as driver of political and social change" Allan Cochrane, The Open University

"An exhilarating discussion, which opens up new ways of thinking about an old problem." Journal of Regional Science

"Both pertinent academically and timely" Susie Cox, De Montfort University

"In developing his conception of beloved community, Peter Somerville brings a fresh and radical perspective to communitarian theory and practice. This book will inspire and provoke readers in equal measure." Jonathan Davies, University of Warwick

"Radically develops ideas explored in the first edition, integrating wide-ranging and nuanced theoretical investigation with compelling argument for the possibility of 'beloved community' and a way beyond the austerity consensus." Jonathan Davies, De Montfort University

"This book is well-written, well-structured and easy to engage with as a result." Dr Stuart Cameron, The University of Bolton.