Policy Press

Publishing with a Purpose

Politics, power and community development

Published

13 Jan 2016

Page count

276 pages

Series

Rethinking community development

ISBN

978-1447317371

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%) Add to basket

Published

13 Jan 2016

Page count

276 pages

Series

Rethinking community development

ISBN

978-1447317364

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£70.00 £56.00You save £14.00 (20%) Add to basket

Published

13 Jan 2016

Page count

276 pages

Series

Rethinking community development

ISBN

978-1447317401

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%) Add to basket

Published

13 Jan 2016

Page count

276 pages

Series

Rethinking community development

ISBN

978-1447317418

Dimensions

234 x 156 mm

Imprint

Policy Press
£24.99 £19.99You save £5.00 (20%)Buy from Amazon.co.uk

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The increasing impact of neoliberalism across the globe means that a complex interplay of democratic, economic and managerial rationalities now frame the parameters and practices of community development. This book explores how contemporary politics, and the power relations it reflects and projects, is shaping the field today.

This first title in the timely Rethinking Community Development series presents unique and critical reflections on policy and practice in Taiwan, Australia, India, South Africa, Burundi, Germany, the USA, Ireland, Malawi, Ecuadorian and Peruvian Amazonia and the UK. It addresses the global dominance of neoliberalism, and the extent to which practitioners, activists and programmes can challenge, critique, engage with or resist its influence.

Addressing key dilemmas and challenges being navigated by students, academics, professionals and activists, this is a vital intellectual and practical resource.

"full of analytical power, and hopeful stories of how community development can support political change...the book has managed to stretch the imagination beyond the gaze of the minority North." Community Development

“Bringing an appropriately political focus to bear on the discussion around community development, this interesting and stimulating collection provides an inclusively international and critical overview of the complex and constant interplay between the processes of community development, politics and power.” Fred Powell, University College Cork

Rosie Meade is a lecturer in Social Policy at University College Cork in Ireland. She has a long-standing activist and academic interest in community development, social movements and community arts, and has published widely on related themes.

Mae Shaw is Senior Lecturer in Community Education at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. With a background in practice, she has a long established interest in the politics of community development and has published widely in this field.

Sarah Banks is Co-director of the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action and Professor in the School of Applied Social Sciences at Durham University, UK. She teaches and researches in the fields of professional ethics, community development and community-based participatory research.

Politics, power and community development: An introductory essay ~ Rosie Meade, Mae Shaw and Sarah Banks;

Part 1: Thinking politically;

The politics of deploying community ~ Janet Newman and John Clarke;

Changing community development roles: The challenges of a globalizing world ~ Sue Kenny;

Part 2: Practising politics;

Community organising and political agency: Changing community development subjects in India ~ Manish K. Jha;

Identity politics, community participation and the making of new places: Examples from Taiwan ~ Yi-Ling Chen;

Community development, venture philanthropy and neoliberal governmentality: A case from Ireland ~ Niamh McCrea;

A shifting paradigm: Engendering the politics of community engagement in India ~ Martha Farrell & Rajesh Tandon;

The politics of diversity in Australia: Extending the role of community practice ~ Helen Meekosha, Alison Wannan and Russell Shuttleworth;

The politics of environmental justice: Community development in Ecuadorian and Peruvian Amazonia ~ María Teresa Martínez and Eurig Scandrett;

Part 3: Politicising the future;

The politics of democracy and the global institutions: Lessons and challenges for community development ~ Niamh Gaynor;

Disability arts: The building of critical community politics and identity ~ Colin Cameron;

Service delivery protests in South Africa: A case for community development? ~ Lucius Botes;

Community development and commons: On the road to alternative economics? ~ Brigitte Krazwald.